South Asian Art is in the Spotlight with the Showcase at the Castle Hill RSL Club

South Asian visual and performing arts were on display during the 16th of August’s Showcase, which took place at the Lyceum at the Castle Hill RSL Club in New South Wales.

Daniel Vijayakumar wrote more about the event. “Showcase is a South Asian Artistic event focused on bringing Sydney’s best South Asian performing and visual artists together to share their craft with the wider community,” he wrote. “Through the show we hope to provide a platform for these artists to leverage and grow from whilst also inspiring the wider community to appreciate and engage more intimately with the arts.”

The event’s mission to give artists a platform is explained more in the event’s press release. “In recent times, there has been a growing interest in the arts amongst South Asian youth. The explosion of social media has provided a medium for young, ambitious and talented individuals to share their work,” stated the release.

“Many aspiring artists have gone on to pursue further study in theatre, visual arts, music and dance. However, the opportunity to showcase their work to the wider community has been lacking. As a result, aspiring artists have struggled to build careers and develop a following. This has prevented South Asian youth from pursuing worthwhile artistic interests and creatively influencing their communities.”

The first Showcase was launched in 2013. “The concept of Showcase is simple. It is a concert that features a diverse range of talented South Asian artists who are pushing boundaries in their respective spheres,” states the release. “Performers operate across a variety of artistic styles, ranging from song to dance as well as other less conventional forms of entertainment.”

Vijayakumar stated that promotional tactics included social media and the ever-present hashtag. “We had a #showcaseyourculture hashtag campaign to generate buzz around the concept of culture. We encouraged individuals across the community to share their stories and highlight the elements that make them proud to be South Asian,” he wrote. “We also shared the stories of our artists through short and catchy videos. This was all driven out to the community via our Facebook page. We also received word-of-mouth promotions through our charity and community partners and amongst family and friends. We also printed fliers and posters which were distributed and displayed across community stores, at community events and on noticeboards.

The Showcase went, as Vijayakumar wrote, “[e]xtremely well. We packed the auditorium with close to 500 people. The quality of performers was top notch and an enjoyable night was had.”

“We trialed a visual arts display which was extremely well received,” continued Vijayakumar. “Four visual artists in the community shared their work in a gallery style setup near the entrance to the auditorium. This was a hugely popular initiative. We also had a Hamper lucky draw from one of our sponsors – Katoomba Foods. There was a lot of interest in this initiative and it added a fun element to the night.”

Vijayakumar stated that aiming for greatness will help with your event planning. “Plan to perfection,” he wrote. “And communicate all relevant details to the critical stakeholders. Above all, don’t forget to enjoy the experience.”